The Black Ferns have won the Rugby World Cup six times, but that stat is hard to find on search engines

KAI SCHWORER/Stuff

The Black Ferns have won the Rugby World Cup six times, but that stat is hard to find on search engines

How many times have New Zealand won the Rugby World Cup? According to Google, it’s three. This is the number of times the All Blacks have won it. For the Black Ferns, that’s six times more than any other nation, but you have to dig a bit to find that stat.

Bias in searchable facts disadvantages women in sport, and a new global initiative led by a group of New Zealand organizations – including NZ Football and Women in Sport Aotearoa – supported by the United Nations Football for the Goals, is trying to change that. .

Correct the Internet, which was launched at the Ferns-US Football match at Eden Park on Saturday, aims to highlight and correct inaccuracies in internet search results and therefore increase the visibility of sportswomen.

Kiwi footballer turned marketing and sponsorship executive Rebecca Sowden is one of the driving forces behind Correct the Internet

Provided

Kiwi footballer turned marketing and sponsorship executive Rebecca Sowden is one of the driving forces behind Correct the Internet

Former Football Fern Rebecca Sowden is one of the driving forces behind Correct the Internet. Founder of sports marketing organization Team Heroine, she says that although many of the world’s top athletes are women, they are not recognized in the same way as their male counterparts.

“Many world sports records are held by women. But when people search online for factual sports information about athletes, the results favor sports people, even when sports people have better stats,” Sowden said.

READ MORE:
* White Fern Sophie Devine named ICC Team Captain of the Year
* Kennedy Cherrington is risking the future of rugby league to honor his Maori culture
* Pole vault ace Eliza McCartney ignores illness and doubts she will return in style

Gorilla Technology chief executive Paul Spain said that as search engine algorithms pick up on what’s popular with major publishers, social media platforms and content creators, search results will reflect inherent preferences. individuals or organizations.

This can lead to biased search results that include information that is not factually correct and is something Sowden is determined to change.

“Because the internet has learned our biases, many of its search engine results are inconsistent, often favor men, and change depending on who is doing the search,” she said.

“Our goal is to empower the next generation of sportswomen by ensuring that when women are the best in the world, the internet reflects that.”

Football Fern Meikayla Moore said the campaign was not about pitting women against men.

David Bernal

Football Fern Meikayla Moore said the campaign was not about pitting women against men.

Correct the Internet provides a tool on its website for the public to report inaccurate information that is sent to search engine providers.

Football Fern Meikayla Moore said Correcting the Internet is not about “pitting women against men”, but rather about highlighting incorrect questionable facts.

“I think it’s important for those who have reached these incredible statistics, but also for all those who witness such a brilliance. Women are heroines, let’s recognize them for that and remove the learned prejudices, empowering and inspiring the next generation,” she said.

Women in Sport Aotearoa acting chief executive Nicky van den Bos said the timing was perfect, especially given the plethora of women’s sports New Zealand has seen over the past 12 months.

“Women’s sport is more than ever in the spotlight. The ICC Women’s Cricket World Cup 2022 and Black Ferns’ performance in the Rugby World Cup last year, and this year’s Fifa Women’s World Cup in New Zealand means internet searches may well reach an all-time high. Let’s make sure the results reflect the facts, not historical biases.

Source link

Leave A Reply